“One does laugh when acknowledging inordinate power, even as one deplores it.”

Bill Buckley on the Israel lobby in his book In Search of Anti-Semitism. Scott McConnell explains how the National Review founder helped establish the Republican party line on Israel:

In the book are many such observations. One belongs to [Joe] Sobran, quoted from a private letter to Buckley: “When I talk to a Palestinian for an hour or two, I am struck at how absolutely bizarre it is that an editor of Commentary or the New Republic can buy a plane ticket to Tel Aviv and instantly benefit from a whole range of rights denied to the native Arabs.” 

So far as the public resolution of the issue was concerned, however, none of Buckley’s ambivalence or ability to see to see the questions as nuanced mattered. Buckley did cut Sobran loose from National Review, and Sobran’s career subsequently deteriorated into the indefensible. Buckley did conclude that what Buchanan wrote “amounted to anti-Semitism,” and even if he appended a highly qualifying clause and defended most of what Buchanan said, Rosenthal got the guilty verdict he had sought. This verdict could then be simplified by the neoconservatives contending for power on the right: “Buchanan anti-Semitic, says Buckley.” And then it could be repeated tens of thousands of times in newspaper columns and soundbites over the next decade, and a lesson would sink in: Buchanan, because of his Israel-related views, had been rightly banished from the ranks of establishment conservatism. For years hence, young conservatives with professional ambitions would draw the necessary conclusions.

archivesofamericanart:

Bibliophiles and print enthusiasts, take note. We have a new blog post owl about bookplates. Ahem, all about bookplates.

Lynd Ward bookplate with owl design, 194-. Lynd Ward bookplates, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

“It’s a letdown if the comedian doesn’t finally actually really sit on his hat.”

Kingsley Amis (via theparisreview)

Hear more from Kingsley Amis in the Repository, where we’ve posted a 1991 BBC “Bookmark” episode on his life.

natgeofound:

A Native American sends smoke signals in Montana, June 1909. Photograph by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon, National Geographic Creative

(via appalachianandrew)

“Civilian deaths reportedly make up the overwhelming majority of Palestinian casualties in Gaza over the last few weeks, and these have resulted from the indiscriminate use of force in a densely populated area. More to the point, Rosenbaum’s argument is extremely similar to the justifications that terrorist groups use when they target civilians in their own attacks. It is based on the completely false assumption that there are no real innocents or bystanders in a given country because of their previous political support for a government and its policies, which supposedly makes it permissible to strike non-military targets. It is very important to reject this logic no matter where it comes from or whose cause in a conflict it is being used to advance, because this is the logic that has been used to justify countless atrocities down through the years.”

Every day at The American Conservative, we highlight several pieces of interest to our readers in our Of Note section. Here’s what others are saying about conservatism and culture today.

  1. How a Closer Relationship with Mexico Could Help Solve the Child Migrant Crisis (photo)
    Reihan Salam, Slate
  2. The Crony Capitalism Machine
    Veronique de Rugy, Reason
  3. New Surveillance Whistleblower: The NSA Violates the Constitution
    Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic
  4. Let Them Eat Cosmopolitanism
    Ryan Avent, Free Exchange
  5. "Basically They’re Black Sites on American Soil"
    Erin McClam, NBC News

Found something else our readers should know about? Tell us about it!

Gracy Olmstead highlights the rise in second-career farming:

As people begin to develop a renewed interest in where their food comes from, many young people and urbanites are seeking out agricultural lifestyles, giving up desk jobs for tractors and field work. But it’s difficult to kickstart a profitable farm, especially as a primary career.

A new initiative in Virginia is striving to help these new farmers—even while encouraging them not to quit their day job.

Read more

"Last Thursday’s downing of Malaysia Airlines flight 17 was an inexcusable crime," Daniel Larison writes. "It fully deserves to be condemned, as the U.S. and other governments have already done, and there seems little doubt as to who the responsible parties are."

But what does the disaster mean for the ongoing conflict between Ukraine and Russia?

“Finance is just a mechanism for allocating resources efficiently. It doesn’t ‘produce’ any goods or services that anybody wants for their own sake. It’s more comparable to law or accounting than to industries like health care, computer software, automobile manufacturing, retailing or education. If finance is growing as a percentage of the economy, that’s prima facie a problem, not a neutral fact.”
livelymorgue:

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos 
livelymorgue:

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

livelymorgue:

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

Every day at The American Conservative, we highlight several pieces of interest to our readers in our Of Note section. Here’s what others are saying about conservatism and culture today.

  1. Are You Living in a Community or a Network? (image)
    Brian Brown, Humane Pursuits
  2. Why Not Rent the American Dream?
    Room for Debate, The New York Times
  3. The Price of Poverty
    Johannes Haushofer, Foreign Affairs
  4. What Are the Benefits of Government-Funded Research?
    Michael White, Pacific Standard
  5. Why the GOP Is Waking Up to the Need for Criminal Justice Reform
    Osita Nwanevu, Slate

Found something else our readers should know about? Tell us about it!

“Facebook is the lingua franca of social relationships in our day and age.”
— Gracy Olmstead took a break from Facebook to focus on what she thought were more meaningful forms of communication, but she found that she couldn’t do without. Find out why.
theweekmagazine:

When U.S. history became a little less black and white
Travel back in time with the country’s first color photographs
theweekmagazine:

When U.S. history became a little less black and white
Travel back in time with the country’s first color photographs
theweekmagazine:

When U.S. history became a little less black and white
Travel back in time with the country’s first color photographs